Palo Alto now requires pre-wiring for electric vehicles…

Should All New Homes Be Pre-Wired to Charge Electric Vehicles?

Emily Badger | The Atlantic Cities | September 1, 2013 | link

Should All New Homes Be Pre-Wired to Charge Electric Vehicles?
Reuters

The city council in Palo Alto, California, unanimously voted Monday night to make a small change to the city’s building code that signals a big shift in the future of private transportation. Now, every new home constructed in town will have to come pre-wired with the ability to charge electric vehicles, a move designed to ensure the city that’s home to cutting-edge car-maker Tesla will also be home to the EV industry’s early-adopting consumers.

Charging infrastructure currently poses one of the biggest obstacles to broad EV use (besides, you know, designing the cars themselves). If you’re the first tech-savvy guy in town with Google Glass, then you get to glimpse the future before all your friends, and they’re probably jealous. If you’re the first guy in town with an electric car – well, you likely can’t drive it that far.

Electric vehicles as a concept require at least a limited critical mass. Without enough drivers, there isn’t demand for charging infrastructure to serve the cars. And without the infrastructure, who would buy one of these things?

Many cities are already at work installing charging stations in public places. But Palo Alto’s idea addresses the location where EV drivers are likely to spend the most time juicing up: in their own driveways and garages. The technical requirement isn’t actually that onerous. As Wired explains, the kind of voltage you’d need to fully charge a car in eight hours (a 220-volt line) already comes standard in many homes that power a washer and dryer.

But while it costs about $200 to build this capacity into new construction, retrofitting a property to accommodate an EV can run four times as much. And that’s separate from the cost of the EV charging station itself (as much as $2,000).

Read more…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s