If you’re moving here from afar, here’s how to start…

Long-Distance Move: How to Plot One Remotely

Susan  Johnston | U.S. News | Dec 13th 2013 | link
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Finding the right house or apartment is rarely easy, but it’s even harder when you’re conducting your search remotely. Just ask Marjorie Comer, 26, a military wife who’s moved several times in the past few years. She and her husband tried to house hunt from afar before they moved from Kansas City, Mo., to Charleston, S.C., in January 2010. Not knowing many people in Charleston, the couple searched online before deciding to drive in for a two-day real estate blitz. “Everything was really gross or way out of our rental price range,” she says. Finally, they settled on a rental in what she describes as a “semi-nice area.”

When the family moved again to Florida in May 2011, Comer says she felt better equipped to find a place to live thanks to the military resources she’d uncovered and the strategies learned from their previous search. They searched online again, then spent a four-day weekend in the area north of Jacksonville, Fla., once they narrowed their search to 10 houses.

Here’s a look at strategies for conducting a real estate search from a distance.

Do your homework online. The Internet has a wealth of information available about rental units and houses for sale, so try websites like craigslist.org or zillow.com to get a feel for the local market. “Know what you’re looking for, how many bedrooms you need and what your price range is,” Comer says.

Alerting your social network can also help. “Don’t be afraid to post on Facebook that you’re looking,” Comer says. “You never know if someone is friends with someone whose brother-in-law lives in that location.”

As Bill Deegan, CEO of renternation.com, a website that advocates for renters, points out, “people usually pick up stakes and move for a reason – for school, family or work – so try to use those networks to get recommendations.” He also suggests using Google Earth to get a feel for the neighborhood, a potential home’s exterior and what amenities are nearby. “If having art galleries or things are important to you, make sure that they’re nearby, and you can have easy access to them,” Deegan says.

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